Sunday, 8 January 2012

Outfit

For the characters outfit, I decided that the best fit would be baggy and scruffy clothes, showing that the distress of losing her child has affected all parts of her, including the lack of care for her personal appearance and clothing.

Music

The type of music we will use will be classical and very instrumental, that which is stereotypical to usual horror films, and have it playing from a music box.

Character

For our psychological thriller, we decided to only have one character in the first opening, as it was only relevant to have one character, and we also didn’t want to show too much content and expand on our story too much on the first two minutes. So therefore we just wanted this one woman, who would have been the main character, and slightly develop her, so people would know what to expect from the rest of the film and if it would be something they’d like to watch.

The woman would be young, having just lost her baby, very disorientated, not know what was going on, from the mourning of her lost child, we also decided that she would have ocd, and somehow incorporate this in an interesting way in the film. She suffers depression from her loss and this overwhelms everything, the way she looks at everything.

I opted to be the actress to play this character as we all thought I was best suited for the character, based on my size, and the young, innocent, vulnerable and naive look.

Film Deconstruction: Misery

For my second deconstruction, I decided to do another old film, again to see the different ways things were begun in different types of thrillers. Again, I hadn't watched this film.


Directed by Rob Reiner. It won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role as Annie Wilkes.


In the first few seconds the screen is black, apart from the reddish orange titles, then the screen goes back to just black and it is silent for a second or two and then the sound of a typewriter comes in, for three seconds before the image of the typewriter appears, this is successful use of a bridge. The hands that are typing are out of focus of the camera and the object of a match and cigarette infront are in focus. Then suddenly it's a jump cut when the 'ting' of the typewriter reaching the end of the page is used well as the camera shot is a long shot of a wine glass, empty. Still with the blurry character in the background, typing. This on screen for a couple of seconds and then changes to a wine bottle in an ice bucket, mid shot, doesn't show the top of the wine bottle. The camera then jumps to the typewriter itself and you read the sentence that reads 'without it, what else was there. ?' The character, revealed to be a man then takes the sheet of paper away and looks at it reading. He then hears a beep, ignores it the first time, and then the second time, puts the paper of the table and writes in pencil 'The End'. He puts the piece of paper on the stack of paper and aligns them up turns them over to the front to read 'Untitled' by 'Paul Sheldon'. The shot then moves on to a brown bag in which he slips the story in  and then pops the cork off the champagne, pours a glass and picks up his cigarette, looks at it and then puts it in his mouth, picks the match up and lights the cigarette, and takes a long drag.


In this opening it definitely leaves you thinking about what could happen next.

I used the YouTube Clip of Misery (1990) Stephen King (Part 1)  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cgqu2W3Ore4

Film Deconstruction: Cape Fear

After deciding to base our film opening idea on psychological thrillers, I thought that if I deconstructed a relatively old film opening then I could see how some of the clich├ęs used began and came about in the beginning. 


Directed by Martin Scorsese, you know that it's going to be a very good film, as he is known for his modern crime and violent films which gain great success and is very well praised for being 'one of the most significant and influential American film makers of all time'.


Having never watched this film, I thought it would be good to do to see how the first two minutes would grab my attention and make me want to watch more and leave me thinking as to how the story would unfold in front me, and for me to wonder what would happen later on.


The establishing shot of the film is what seems to be a lake, with the rippling water flowing along across the scene, it seems to be early morning, or late evening; it has the titles appearing across during the first minutes. The music playing is instrumented by violins and is quite calm but stereotypical of a thriller, making you think something bad will happen soon; when the film reaches thirty eight seconds the music changes, in the same style and piece to a scarier tune, with pace picking up and tension building, on the screen appears a reflection of a very large bird, bird of prey perhaps, the bird looks almost evil and capable of hurting you as it's strong wings fly through the sky. The image of the bird is very brief, and is on screen for a few seconds. 


When the clip reaches one minute the mise-en-scene of the lake fades away to a black version of the lake, still flowing and the music continues to rise to a crescendo and the on the screen a single eye shows up, possibly a male, as regard to no make up. You see the eye move into different places within the sky, with the eye itself looking around. The eye closes and disappears and the lake continues to flow across the scene with the continuation of the titles. During the next twenty seconds, various images of parts of the body, including teeth, fade in and out. Next appears the whole face of a man with a beard, portraying fear into the audience, only briefly and then fades back out. The water keeps changing shape and the focust in the water, as if the moon is shining is emphasized when the different images of the face fade out, it seems as if now the time of day has changed to night. Then again, another whole face appears, perhaps a different one as it is still slightly blurred, covering the identity which could play a significant part in the rest of the film; it then fades back into the lake.


This opening made me think about the type of music we could use to create the type of suspension we need, interesting ways that we could show the titles, and interesting use of fades with different images relevant to the rest of our film.


The film, Cape Fear received Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations for Best Actor (Robert DeNiro) and Best Supporting Actress (Juliette Lewis), and was nominated for The Golden Bear, and nominated in 100 movie quotes, 'Come out, come out, wherever you are'. The Simpsons also used the film as a parody in an episode as 'Cape Feare'.


I used the YouTube Clip of Cape Fear - Part One. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66m1KIHl1tA